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Statute of Limitations


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#1 Kirok

 

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Posted 21 February 2009 - 12:36 AM

Let me give you a hypothetical situation.

Say you produced a series - a fan film series or audio drama, doesn't matter which - over four years ago, right back in the pioneering days of fan productions, should your current work be judged on it?

Remember, you and your group were just starting out, the writing, acting and general production values were reasonably good for an amateur production. At the time you gathered a strong following and gained a certain fan following so that you are still producing today. Not the same production, maybe, but even if you were the episodes would be a quantum leap above what you produced when you started out.

Do you think it is fair to have your original work dragged out and used as an example of how slack fan productions can be?

Yes, it's happening but, no, I don't think it's fair for me to point them out.

I'm gonna go meditate, now. :crybaby:

K

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#2 hudson

 

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Posted 21 February 2009 - 08:46 AM

No it's not fair.

It's one thing to say "Your old stuff wasn't that good but look at the improvements" it's quite another to say "I'm not watching it because it used to be rubbish".

Usually there are other reasons for it or it's just people that hate fan created stuff as a point of principle.

Another thing I don't like is "CGI is great, acting is rubbish". Even if there is room for improvement or the odd duff bit, that generalisation rarely holds true.

#3 Kirok

 

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Posted 21 February 2009 - 06:07 PM

You've hit the nail on the head. It's bias, pure and simple.

If this were real critique I could accept it, but it's opinion - the former is (or should be) predominantly objective and backed up with logic whereas the latter is subjective and based on personal tastes. There are an increasing number of blogs out there that are putting airs and graces on their opinions by calling themselves "critique" when they are failing in the basic principles of citizen journalism.

It's as if they think they have some magic shield that allows them to put out the most blatant guff with impunity for if you challenge it they fall back on the old "You just can't take critique" ploy. I - and I'm sure the majority of fan production groups - can accept critique just as I can accept that others have differing opinions from me but if you want to dress it up as critique then you need to be prepared to back it up with something a bit better than a white-wash of buzz words.

Sad to say I have not reacted in my normal cuddly-wuddly manner because I fail to see why they should be allowed to get away with flaunting the rules of journalism.

K

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#4 Terilynn

 

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Posted 22 February 2009 - 01:30 PM

You've hit the nail on the head. It's bias, pure and simple.

If this were real critique I could accept it, but it's opinion - the former is (or should be) predominantly objective and backed up with logic whereas the latter is subjective and based on personal tastes. There are an increasing number of blogs out there that are putting airs and graces on their opinions by calling themselves "critique" when they are failing in the basic principles of citizen journalism.

It's as if they think they have some magic shield that allows them to put out the most blatant guff with impunity for if you challenge it they fall back on the old "You just can't take critique" ploy. I - and I'm sure the majority of fan production groups - can accept critique just as I can accept that others have differing opinions from me but if you want to dress it up as critique then you need to be prepared to back it up with something a bit better than a white-wash of buzz words.

Sad to say I have not reacted in my normal cuddly-wuddly manner because I fail to see why they should be allowed to get away with flaunting the rules of journalism.

K


Don't blame you K. Foundations of any argument or opinion must be laid first. While blogs are opinion - opinion means nothing without using the basics of any legitimate journalist/debater - lay the foundation of your argument and research your subject first before spouting off and try to provide a legitimate reason for that opinion to exist.

Trashing Star Wars for its effects now is kind of stupid - it was AMAZING in the 70s...why would we diss it now because it doesn't match current standards?

I know my initial works BLOW in comparison to my more recent work and hopefully my work in the future will be VASTLY better than what I'm doing now. If someone trashed my older work, frankly I wouldn't blame them - but I would hope that they would be more amenable to seeing the improvements I've made since I began on this journey.

Deference to initial works should be made...and support for the improvements should also be made - ESPECIALLY in fan works...because we are, really, in all of this together.

#5 Kirok

 

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Posted 23 February 2009 - 04:09 AM

I know my initial works BLOW in comparison to my more recent work and hopefully my work in the future will be VASTLY better than what I'm doing now. If someone trashed my older work, frankly I wouldn't blame them - but I would hope that they would be more amenable to seeing the improvements I've made since I began on this journey.

Deference to initial works should be made...and support for the improvements should also be made - ESPECIALLY in fan works...because we are, really, in all of this together.

One of the 'buzz words' that was dragged out in one article was the dreaded 'Mary Sue' with regards to a certain highly regarded audio drama whose core characters are descended from a decades old role playing game and a couple of which can be classed as 'self-insertions' in that they are named after their real-life creators. :o Shock! Horror!

Its disappointing when you see something that could be classed as a Mary Sue or self-insertion in fan fiction because it usually means that the author has missed out on developing their story as they could but critics who dogmatically condemn anything that remotely fits these definitions are guilty of being just as lazy in creating their own critique!

Come on guys! What are the autobiographically based stories of Jack London, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Hemingway but self-insertions?! How many professional works have you read that have an annoyingly super-efficient, intelligent, strong and charismatic hero? That are nothing but a vehicle for showing how wonderful their character is? Which are frankly nothing but a Mary Sue in an original work?

My point is that London's, Fitzgerald's and Hemingway's life experiences are an integral part of what makes their works great and to condemn them because they are auto-biographical would be nonsensical! Just because a fan-created character is based on its writer should not automatically disqualify it from serious consideration. The question you need to ask yourself is, if you didn't know that the character was named after the actor would you say that they were badly performed or that their part in the story was inconsequential or badly used? If the answer is yes then you have a legitimate grievance against the writer or actor that does not need to be couched in twee 'put-down words' but can be pointed out more accurately - as a good critique should.

If the answer is no then you have to question your own prejudices. If you have a problem with fan productions that originated in Role Playing Games then you're going to miss out on some fine work including the audio drama Excelsior and the critically acclaimed fan film group Star Trek: Intrepid.

Again, my apologies for venting but better I do so in an open forum in general terms than to engage in flames - I gave that up after the Great WikiWar of '07.

K

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#6 Terilynn

 

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Posted 23 February 2009 - 12:49 PM

vent away K...I don't blame you.

#7 WJT

 

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Posted 01 March 2009 - 06:17 PM

We talking about any reviewer in particular here?

Forgive my tendency to assume everyone in the room is talking about me; we reviewers are egotistical to a degree that would astonish Kyle Wilson*. It was enough to make me actually register my username here, much to the astonishment of all. And, even if you're not talking about me, fan-film reviewer gossip is rare enough that I start to salivate at the mere sight of it.

Also, are you referring to Mak from S31/LF, or some version of Judah Frieze? Because both of those characters are placed beyond criticism by the excellence of their actors (albeit in wildly different manners) and wit of the writing behind them--despite both being flaming Marty Stus.

*Footnote I: If you caught that reference, you may press the button. Whoooo-hoohoohoo!**

**Footnote II: If you caught that reference, you may press the button again, because, truly, your credibility as a consumer of only the finest science-fiction is beyond question.

Edited by WJT, 01 March 2009 - 06:19 PM.

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#8 Kirok

 

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Posted 02 March 2009 - 06:03 AM

Hi WJ!

I think the problem is that the internet doesn't convey the passage of time well. How many times have you been surfing the web looking for comments & facts or new material and found what you thought was a great article only to find that it was published in 2006 and the author has now disappeared? I have to be particularly careful when reporting on long-standing projects that I have the latest information so that I don't embarrass myself by running some "breaking news" on something that they have dropped months ago.

Star Trek: Phase II are in a constant state of reinventing themselves. Starting as Star trek: New Voyages with the release of Come What May, they are so embarrassed by it now that they quote it as their "pilot episode" and I don't think it is on their download page any more although it is still available on their mirrors.

Star Trek: Hidden Frontier are an even more extreme example with a specific warning that they want new viewers to start watching their series from season three (from memory). Why? because they don't want people to think that this is an example of the quality of their work and rightly so because it is not a patch on their later work. My point is that unless there is a specific disclaimer like this to point out when it was made, the casual viewer might have no idea and condemn the whole series unfairly.

You have to place each production into its context and at the risk of blowing my own trumpet I like to think that this was what I did with "Five Fan Films, A Chronology". They were not made in isolation! Hidden Frontier was a major influence on "Tales of The Seventh Fleet" and Intrepid (along with Exeter) and it was in turn influenced by New Voyages. Looking at Hidden Frontier now and thinking that you can set all the seasons next to each other like a series "boxed set", as if you can expect them to make a coherent extended story arc is wrong. The one thing you WILL see is the way that they have developed from a basic home video setup to a production group that is spawning spin-offs and indies!

Was I that obvious about Mak and Judah? Basing a condemnation of their characters and portrayal primarily because they originated from a Role Playing Game is, I still contend, unfair. Saying that Section 31 is part of an extended storyline that includes Pioneers, Lost Frontier and Defiant is like saying that my life has some affinity to the family of the girl my son might get married to in the future! Darker Projects and Pendant Productions are like the estranged but favourite uncle and auntie who vied for your affection as a child! They share a common history but their differences and the paths that they took are much more significant! Pioneers was a totally independant production that was taken under the wing of DP to help Kevin Cho continue so that their relationship might be more like an adoption.

The relationship between S31 and Lost Frontier is more complex. Section 31 tended to meander through its story arcs and personally I found its bottle stories better than it's extended arcs. Lost Frontier I feel is much more cohesive as a series that is building its back-story on only a hint of what was done in Section 31. I still contend that the appearances of characters from the previous series is more in terms of allowing them a way of resolving their story in a more satisfying manner than the Dalek invasion ending that I remember.

My main fear is that, like Hidden Frontier, Darker Project's Star Trek: The Lost Frontier might be written off as a continuation or "tag-end" to The Section 31 Files.

K

Latest releases !!! ~ March 11 - HFO Personal Logs 2 ~ March 19 - PD Smith-Tales From the Fleet 01 : Species 571 ~ March 11 - Bruffy-NovaTrek06 : A Tale Of Two Captains, Pt 2 ~
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#9 WJT

 

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Posted 03 March 2009 - 07:19 PM

Hi, Kirok!

You're quite clearly correct that one can't judge a whole fan series by its early work. In fact, I've found it nearly impossible to use the same rating scale for a fanprod as it evolves from year to year. What could easily have been a three-star episode in the show's first season will often turn out to be a two- or even a one-point-five star rating two or three years in, because the show has evolved so much that the bar is considerably higher. I agree with you wholeheartedly; I was merely afraid that this was my six-month-old sideswipe at HF acting coming back to haunt me... again.

This raises an interesting question, though: who else is doing fan film reviews right now? I'm always keeping my eyes peeled, but, other than the occasional thousand-word one-off rant on the TrekBBS and your Derek Kessler's too-brief run posting reviews here, it's hard to come by regular reviewers--particularly ones who are not worshipfully positive about all they encounter. So: who the heck you readin', thar?

You weren't too obvious about Mak and Judah; I just happen to be a rather over-informed person when it comes to fanprods, and I've had the same arguments with certain persons who shall remain unnamed. You're also still right: much (most?) of the best fanprod storytelling right now is coming out of projects that have their ultimate roots in RPG's. Discrimination against them merely demonstrates ignorance of the form; I've seen (and played on) some RPG's with exceptionally strong writers, who, in collaboration, seem capable of stories that are beyond the dreams of some of our esteemed professional Trek authors. I happen to have some idea what the plans are on some of the lesser-known shows, and, frankly, I think I couple of them aren't going to be "lesser-known" for long once the scripts start rolling out. In addition, anyone who pretends that Section 31 is consistent with its own universe, to say nothing of its extended family in Defiant, Lost Frontier, and Pioneers, is sadly deranged. (There are still crazier people out there: I once encountered someone who seriously claimed that Section 31 was a consistent part of the Hidden Frontier universe! I fear I made rather more sport of the man than was strictly necessary.) They're a decent little family of shows, but Eric Busby's priority is not intershow continuity. I actually think this is a big part of Darker Projects' success: the lesser focus on continuity porn means that the stories are focused on the stories, not the universe. That sets it apart from at least a large part of the HF-verse (and, to a small extent, Defiant). But I'll save the rest of that discussion for my forthcoming review of Diplomatic Relations' last outing, "Agrément."

Mm. I didn't realize how fun it could be to vehemently agree with someone for a while. It's been fun.

Now that it's been a few months, and publication prospects seem to have dimmed to black, do you mind if I start mining those quickie-reviews I sent you for spare parts? Or is there still a chance that the audio drama 'zine will be released? Or was it released and I just missed it?

WJT

Post-script. Phase II has pedaled away from "Come What May" faster than Batman from a nudist colony. They really ought not; it's not a bad episode by any fan-film standard, and it's not as if they're going to fool anybody into thinking they're professionals in any case. Furthermore, I thought CWM was amusing.
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#10 Kirok

 

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Posted 03 March 2009 - 11:55 PM

You weren't too obvious about Mak and Judah; I just happen to be a rather over-informed person when it comes to fanprods, and I've had the same arguments with certain persons who shall remain unnamed. You're also still right: much (most?) of the best fanprod storytelling right now is coming out of projects that have their ultimate roots in RPG's. Discrimination against them merely demonstrates ignorance of the form; I've seen (and played on) some RPG's with exceptionally strong writers, who, in collaboration, seem capable of stories that are beyond the dreams of some of our esteemed professional Trek authors. I happen to have some idea what the plans are on some of the lesser-known shows, and, frankly, I think I couple of them aren't going to be "lesser-known" for long once the scripts start rolling out.

Sounds interesting! I do wonder though if the large number of groups announcing their expansion into audio drama realise the particular challenges involved in writing for audio.

Now that it's been a few months, and publication prospects seem to have dimmed to black, do you mind if I start mining those quickie-reviews I sent you for spare parts? Or is there still a chance that the audio drama 'zine will be released? Or was it released and I just missed it?

:blush: The wheels have sort off fallen off my life over the past two months and the next two-three months represent the "Long March" back from, uh, there. By all means, if you're thinking of writing a full blown article on any of the mini reviews you did, feel free to use them as the basis. I'll let you know as I get closer to releasing so that i can get some comparable comment.

Fun as critique might be for the hardier spirits amongst us, I steer clear of public critique because, whether the writer means it to or not, they can create elites and cliques, winners and losers. I'm not against critique totally because it can serve as a constructive force for the creators as well as a guide for listeners who might otherwise have to wade through hours of audio but it can be vitriolic just as much as it can be fanboyish.

No, I'm not talking specifically about you, WJ, I'm thinking more of the bloggers and forum ranters whose opinions can be taken as critique. I'll admit to being one of the writers whose works can be classed as predominantly positive because I make no bones about the fact that i see the purpose of my work as an unofficial publicity arm for fan productions in general. I rationalise it by saying that i focus on what a production is rather than what it is not.

As an editor I would never interfere in an author's critique (beyond the statutory blocks against libel and slander) even though I might not agree with it all. I would however expect them to respond to any Letters of Comment their work might generate. As we've discussed offline critique is not a one-way street, the subjects of critique always have that right of reply which can become a dialogue and this can become even more valuable for the reader/listener because it shows the creative motives and aspirations of the creators - the reasons behind what they are doing.

No, WJ, I've always found your reviews to be reasoned even when I disagreed with them. What I've taken exception to here have been "reviews" that seemed unreasonable. Calling work into question by sticking "labels" on them rather than being specific and naming other productions so that they are tarred by the same brush is either (i) journalistically slipshod or (ii) playing mind games, neither of which helps the subject of the review nor the reader/listener.

K

Latest releases !!! ~ March 11 - HFO Personal Logs 2 ~ March 19 - PD Smith-Tales From the Fleet 01 : Species 571 ~ March 11 - Bruffy-NovaTrek06 : A Tale Of Two Captains, Pt 2 ~
Kirok of L'Stok - Director of Media ..... "I love deadlines! I love the whooshing sound they make as they fly by!" - Douglas Adams

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#11 WJT

 

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Posted 05 March 2009 - 08:49 PM

Kirok:

I have discovered the Personal Message system! The wonders of modern science!

However, I took long enough in the discovery that you ended up posting anyway in despite. Ah, well. I'm sorry for the added labour. I'm sorry about your illness, but I'm glad to hear you're on the mend.

Sounds interesting! I do wonder though if the large number of groups announcing their expansion into audio drama realise the particular challenges involved in writing for audio.


I have to admit, I don't know anything about the new shows (though I am keeping close eyes on the Wowbagger List for updates). Still more unfortunately, my secret contacts who unwittingly fed me inside information on The Continuing Mission have all dried up of late, which leaves me with information that's months out of date. But I need only point to the success of "The Darkness of Thoughts" for evidence as to the likely (high) quality of the rest of the Sword of Romulus trilogy (and anything else written by this David Raines character). A couple of the other older, established, but not well-known shows are making good noises, too. The new shows? We'll see. I always find it disturbing when a show goes into a multi-month hiatus right after their first episode, and it takes a couple of smooth releases after that to regain my trust. Diplomatic Relations did that, Starfleet Renegades did that, and Dimensions not only did it, but have now announced what appears to be a spinoff! (Multi-month hiatuses are, of course, practically a way of life for Eras, but I don't include them because Eras is pretty honest about being a slow-paced production up front, and they do release regularly, if slowly. Eras gets big points in my book for that long-term reliability.) Those newbies might turn out to be amazing in time, or they might fold up on themselves like a Romulan warp drive on overload. If I were a betting man (and I am), I'd put my money on DR to be the big success of the 2008 freshmen.

I'm certainly pleased you don't hold my reviews against me (and, now that I've read what you're talking about, I begin to see the distinction you're drawing). You, personally, perform a great service to the community in your role as "unofficial promoter," and I don't think you're thanked or even noticed nearly often enough for the amount of work you do. Certainly, in such a position, you can hardly afford to be negative about any production. Of course, you have your favorites, but you couldn't do what you do without having genuinely warm feelings towards everyone in the field. I like to think that I approach every production with an open mind and a real hope that they will succeed in entertaining me, but, as you know, there are some shows that really don't do that to me, for any number of reasons, and I take them to task for it. I can be rather harsh. I justify it much less eloquently than you: I do it because I'm being paid to tell people what I really think. (Strange realization: in the entire fan film community, which must consist of hundreds upon hundreds of people by now, I may be the only one getting paid. Of course, I am not getting paid very much, but it is real cash money.)

However, my base capitalism aside, I think you may be dismissing the opinions of random forum-goers and blog-ranters too lightly. There is a wisdom among the average folk, the unpaid commentators and random* websurfers, that we creative types ignore at our own peril. I believe that any normal person who views any work of art or entertainment can intuitively draw important conclusions about that work based on his own experience and the work's relationship with objective human truths, and these intuitions, I find, are generally quite right. The difficulty comes when one of these average persons, with neither the vocabulary nor the requisite deep thought, tries to put his feelings to text in a rant, a rave, or even a balanced recommendation. It's not that their feelings about whatever they've just experienced are wrong; it's that they've failed to fully understand their own reasoning process, and so they resort to inaccurate complaints, or, worse, the media and journalistic tropes you mention. For instance, take the example of the "Mary Sue." This is a word that is thrown around far too often for the word to even have a meaning anymore--it's become possible to name nearly any character in any story a "Mary Sue" based on some of the looser criteria that have been thrown around over the years. So, when a writer labels a character a "Mary Sue," this tends to be shorthand for any one of a large array of problems the writer saw with the character, but which he couldn't accurately identify. It may be that he thought plot developments around the character were too convenient, or that he's too "cute", or too human, or too inhuman, or that he faced too many challenges or not enough or didn't fit with the show's "feel" or just plain got too much air time. This is useful, and usually (to a greater or lesser extent) true, but the author wasn't thinking deeply enough to get that out there. And why should he? He's not being paid!

I suppose that the point I'm trying to get across at great length is only this: under every unconstructive review, however short, however long, however mild, however snidely cutting, there's a superbly valuable constructive review waiting to come out. There's some use to arguing a bad review, but there's much more use, I find, to trying to get down in concrete terms exactly, in clear and unambiguous terms, what caused the review to be a bad one. A lot of learning about art and human nature gets learned right there. On the other hand, this basic trust of the hidden wisdom of nearly everyone has gotten me into an awful lot of trouble, such as religious belief.

I refer here, of course, to those who are listing honest opinions (however brusquely) and are not in it purely to be snide. This generally means I exclude YouTube commentors from my "wisdom of the crowds" philosophy.

Finally--and this is the part where I trumpet my own horn instead of everyone else's--on the subject of cliques in fan filmdom: I think that cliques are bound to form. Indeed, I think they have formed: there are some extremely strong cliques surrounding certain (unnamed) productions. At least one production out there believes that, by virtue of predating most others, it has thereby laid claim to the entire post-War twenty-fourth century canon, and any productions that don't "respect" that claim are to be appreciated for their hard work but otherwise severed from the "network." This is but one example--one sees it in several places at varying strengths.

I believe that the orthodoxy of positive feelings that dominates the fan film community helps those kinds of cliques to develop. Rather than being judged on quality, shows instead are judged based on their connections to a complicated fan film network. Little shows get publicity and therefore downloads not by putting out a superior product to the others, but by being taken in under the wing of more prominent ones and doing crossovers, cross promotions, scavenging for "plug" opportunities, and so forth. It's not a good model, and it allows big shows to turn into kingmakers surrounded by competitive cliques of the worst kind.

Now, things are not nearly so stark nor so grim as all that--the big shows really do put out good products, and little shows really can get noticed if they do amazing things. But it is a problem, and the fact that nearly no one is willing to speak objectively about the various shows and put them on what I like to call "the sliding scale of win vs. suck" only perpetuates the cliques. There will be winners and losers; the only question is whether they'll be determined by quality or by raw power.

In this respect, I like to think that I provide something of a public service, not only by providing a useful guide to audiences, by recommending changes in productions (the fruitful dialogue you mention is indeed the summit of that relationship), and perhaps by getting at certain important truths best conveyed by but not expressed in art, but also by helping the fan film ecosystem gain a little bit more of a rational power equilibrium.

This may very well be nothing more than frightfully egotism, but it strikes me as at least having the ring of truth.

I've now gone off on quite the tangent from what you were talking about, though. Sorry about that!

WJT

*Note: Much noise has been made lately of the "abuse" of the word "random" to mean the same as "various, with no distinguishing characteristics defining the set." It is contended that "random" has been reduced from its meaning as "utterly unpredictable" to this common usage, and that this debasement has damaged a delicate and scientifically precise term. For a time, I, in my self-appointed role as Grammar Nazi, attempted to enforce the "proper" use of the word. However, I recently learned that this whole position is a load of dingo's kidneys. The vulgar use of "random" dates at least to the mid-nineteenth century, when no less a personage than President Lincoln used it in his celebrated July 4, 1861 address to Congress. So feel free to keep on talking about "that random guy who came up to me and started saying this random thing. Oh, it was so totally random!" You, the commoner, are in the right, and the dictionary-beating grammar zealot shaking his head at the impending ruin of civilization through bad grammar is wrong.
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#12 Kirok

 

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Posted 06 March 2009 - 08:34 PM

Goodness me! :blush: lavender blood under dark skin does not a pretty picture make when a Klingon blushes! :D Thank you, rest assured I'm determined to get back into the saddle. Thanks for reminding me that I still need to listen to the latest DR episode and I agree that the last installment of The Continuing Mission was masterful stuff both in terms of its writing and production.

I can't disagree with anything you say really - it would be a dull old world if everyone was sent home with a gold star for effort. By the same token though the art of giving and taking critique is something that has to be consciously worked on. As a critic you will have worked on your technique and research, as a writer and producer I need to realise that there is a message from everyone. If a fan sincerely doesn't "get" my message after trying then I have to ask why and wonder if there is some tweak needed to my plot, script, production or publicity

I hate cliques because they are exclusive rather than inclusive. Whilst there is no doubting that there are "Gas Giants" in the Trek fan community who have their own satellite systems of individuals and groups that orbit them with newsletters, podcasts, artwork, fan fiction and of course audio and video guest appearances and a common fanon. There's nothing wrong with this as such because it fosters creativity and I don't think I've ever heard of a group excluding anyone. Even the creative differences between DP & 'Planet P' are balanced by the common ground that they share in cast and fans.

I was thinking more in terms of comments and attitudes from outside the fan community than within. The Wikipedia attitude for example, that a fan production is only of "notability' when it has been mentioned in mainstream media of a certain standing and the occasional fawning over the professional involvement in fan productions whilst cocking a snoot at the fan contributions. In most every case I can think of, in audio and video, the involvement of professionals has raised the bar for the fans, whether it has been as cast or crew and the resulting production has been a credit to all concerned but does this mean that a production without professional involvement is automatically devoid of 'notability'? Professionalism is the goal that fans aim for because without it your production will not attain its peak potential - its the yeast in the loaf, the glazing on the pastry and the dog in the hotdog ... my body is sending me subliminal messages that it is time for lunch!

I'll get down to some real work after lunch!

K

Latest releases !!! ~ March 11 - HFO Personal Logs 2 ~ March 19 - PD Smith-Tales From the Fleet 01 : Species 571 ~ March 11 - Bruffy-NovaTrek06 : A Tale Of Two Captains, Pt 2 ~
Kirok of L'Stok - Director of Media ..... "I love deadlines! I love the whooshing sound they make as they fly by!" - Douglas Adams

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#13 WJT

 

WJT

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Posted 08 March 2009 - 03:13 AM

As a final note, I want to make a theatre recommendation. The odds of you ever having the chance to see this play are roughly slim to none, but, if you do by chance err on the side of slim, make sure you see this.

It's an obscure little play from the 2002 Minnesota Fringe Festival called "The Worst Show at the Fringe," in which, having received a really cruel review for his really awful play ("My Emails with Shakespeare"), an outraged playwright kidnaps the reviewer in question and ties him up in a chair in an empty apartment. Hilarity, as they say, ensues.

Outside of my reviewing, I do write (not that I would ever allow anyone to find out exactly what I write, because I am fully aware that my work does not live up to my own highest standards and wouldn't want to spark a series of revenge reviews), and "Fringe" was an intensely entertaining and enlightening experience from both perspectives. If you ever get a chance to see it, do so. You'll love it.

My body is sending me messages that daylight savings time just changed, which signals to me that it's time to call it a night.

WJT
W. Joseph Thomas
Reviews: Noriega.biz

#14 JHauck

 

JHauck

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Posted 11 December 2011 - 02:10 AM

sounds good. can't wait to review and post your CG series' youtube clips at "New Worlds".

http://starbase_hell.../anthology.html
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